Monday, July 29, 2013

SBS bus 'ghost' caught on camera



SBS bus 'ghost' caught on camera
16/3/09 monday
A Shin Min Daily reader captured a 'ghost' on his camera phone late on Sunday and sent the images to the paper.

According to the Chinese daily, the reader, Mr Chen Lai Fu, 40, said that he has had the ability to see spirits since he was 6 years old.

Mr Chen, who works in advertising, said that when he boarded the bus on Sunday night, he was surprised to find a small boy "playing a fool in the bus".

The boy, whom Mr Chen said looked to be about 9 years old, was playing and talking to himself, but no one on the bus seemed to notice.
He was at the front of the bus and even turned to talk to the bus driver, but the driver showed no response, said Mr Chen.

At one point, the boy even came to the back of the bus where he was sitting to "count the number people on the bus".

Mr Chen said the boy had asked the driver: "Was there an accident?" but the driver did not respond and did not seem to notice his presence.

He then moved to the back of the bus, where he sat beside Mr Chen, and began counting the number of passengers slowly before stopping to exclaim, "wow, so many people!"

Apparently, the boy took an interest in Mr Chen once he realised he could see him.

"He was wearing a grey jacket and yellow shorts. After he realised I was looking at him, he seemed afraid. However later on, he came back and wanted to play with me. He passed his jacket to me, but I ignored him."

Mr Chen said he was on the bus for seven minutes. Throughout the ride, the boy did not stop playing and according to Mr Chen, "creating a scene".

During the journey, Mr Chen noticed two male passengers, one Chinese the other, Indian, looking over in the boy's general direction, but they did not do anything.

"Till I got down the bus, no one reacted or did anything to stop the boy. I cannot confirm if anyone saw him."

'Third eye' developed after high fever

According to Mr Chen, he developed the ability to see spirits after he fell ill with a high fever when he was a child.

However, he only saw them as white shadows, until about 2006, when the figures began to take on human shapes and likeness.

"Some of these spirits walk on the tips of their toes, while others walk normally. I once saw 9 'slashes' or scars on the face of one spirit, that was the closest and clearest image I ever got," said Mr Chen.

What convinced Mr Chen that he was able to 'see' spirits around him, was because his friends around him were never able to see what he saw.

Capturing ghosts on film "not impossible"
According to a Chinese medium and "ghost-catcher", Mr Zhou De Fa, 33, spirits usually cannot be captured on camera clearly. However, Mr Zhou does not rule out the possibility.

Speaking to reporters from Shin Min, he said children of about four to six years of age are more likely to see spirits. Hence, one may find kids speaking to no one in particular, or they may be scared to go to a certain place.

In addition to children, the aged, as well as those who have had a bout of high fever, may be able to see spirits, said Mr Zhou.

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Poltergeist activity caught on shop CCTV ?



Image credit: YouTube
A video has surfaced on the Internet that appears to show items in a shop moving by themselves.

Believed to have been filmed at a Whitstable Nutrition Centre in Kent, the video shows CCTV footage of a man browsing the aisles when a box of teabags on the shelf behind him begins to move on its own before hovering in the air for several seconds. The voices behind the camera suggest that a staff member is showing the video to a female friend who seems genuinely impressed by what she's seeing.

Since appearing on YouTube the video has received around 10,000 views and is beginning to circulate on social media sites. Does the footage represent evidence of paranormal activity or could there be a more conventional explanation ?


A remarkable video which appears to show a poltergeist in a Whitstable shop is proving an internet sensation. The clip on YouTube films security footage apparently taken at the Whitstable Nutrition Centre. As a shopper browses, a box emerges from the shelf behind him and hovers in the air.


Tuesday, July 23, 2013

'Evil Spirit' Scam Plagues Asian Immigrants In NYC



NEW YORK -- One woman was told by a fortune teller that her son was possessed by demons. Another was approached on a Chinatown street by a stranger who eerily claimed her daughter would die in two days. A third was informed that her dead husband was communicating from the grave, telling her to hand over thousands in cash.

"Your son will die in a car accident – he is cursed," a 65-year-old was told.

In each instance, the women bundled up cash and jewelry in a bag and gave it to strangers they'd just met – self-proclaimed spiritual healers. They were told the contents would be blessed in an effort to ward off evil spirits, bring good luck to the family or heal a sick child – they just have to wait a period of time to re-open it.

When they do, they find water bottles, cough drops and beans. But no valuables.

Detectives say there has been a rash in New York of what's known as an evil spirit or blessing scam, where older immigrant women, mostly Chinese, are swindled out of their valuables by clever scammers arriving from China who prey on superstition and fear. In the past six months, two dozen victims have reported valuables stolen – in some cases more than $10,000 in cash and $13,000 in jewelry, according to police reports. A total of more than $1.8 million has been stolen.

"They know the culture, they know how to talk to these victims to get them to listen," chief New York Police Department spokesman Paul Browne said of the grifts. "One person's spirituality is another's superstition, and they prey on that distinction."

The scam itself has many permutations, but the basic principle is the same: A woman, usually in her 50s or older, is approached by a stranger, usually a younger woman, who asks the woman if she knows where to find a particular healer or fortune teller. Another seeming stranger joins the conversation, says she knows where the healer is located, and convinces the older woman to come along. The healer convinces the victim that in order to ward off some evil, she must hand over valuables in a bag to be blessed. And then they switch the bag.

Similar scams occur in other places in the U.S. with large Asian communities, such as Boston, Seattle, Chicago and in Hawaii. In San Francisco late last year, thieves stole about $2 million in nearly 60 cases. Police there called the scams an organized crime ring. The district attorney's office, police and politicians waged a public safety awareness campaign, including community meetings and a video depicting a reenactment of a scam and tips on how to spot one.

The grift may be prevalent right now in Asian neighborhoods, but it's also rampant in Haitian and Latino communities where there is also distrust of Western culture and banks, and plenty of cash and valuables kept at home, said Dr. Alan Hilfer, director of psychology at Maimonides Medical Center in New York.


"It has to do with the idea of not necessarily adopting Western belief systems about magic and incantation systems, but staying with some of their traditional spiritual beliefs," he said. "And, in many cases they're so lost and desperate in a foreign culture they will turn to anyone who offers them something in a language they can understand."

A similar public awareness campaign has been underway in New York. Detectives in Chinatowns in Brooklyn and Manhattan have canvassed the streets warning of the scams and put up posters in Mandarin and English warning women.

"The power of belief is serious," Hilfer said. "And faced with an idea of a very expensive, absolutely incomprehensible, say, MRI machine versus someone putting grains or coins into a bag with incantations, it's just less frightening and unfamiliar to them."

New York City detectives say there is no larger criminal organization at work here, most scammers operate in groups of three or five and then disappear after, mostly fleeing back to China. Some arrests have been made, but recovery of the valuables is difficult.

The awareness campaign helped one 67-year-old woman, who turned the tables on the scammers, police and prosecutors said. She was approached June 3 in Manhattan's Chinatown. A younger Chinese girl on the street asked where to find a particular doctor. The accomplice joined and said she knew the doctor, and a third woman turned up saying she was a relative. They persuaded the woman that she was cursed. But rather than go home and bundle up her valuables, she called the cops, who set up a sting and nabbed five suspects after they'd stolen the 67-year-old's bag of fake jewelry.

Manhattan prosecutors charged the five with grand larceny. They are all from China. Lawyers for three didn't return calls seeking comment. But a lawyer for Jun Liang, 44, and Jingchang Quan, 44 said his clients were innocent.

"The prosecution so far seems to be creating guilt by association by pointing out similar cases that have happened around the country," attorney Jae Lee said. "But to really make out a case they're going to have to prove that it was these particular individuals that had the intent to defraud people."

Browne said it looked like the sting broke the scammers' spell: There have been no new reported thefts since.



Student’s “Psychic Attack” at Japanese All-Girls School Sends 18 to Hospital


The strange series of events saw 18 schoolgirls end up in hospital after experiencing trouble breathing.

In a classic case of mass hysteria, troubles at the all-girls Kamigōri High school in Japan started when one girl complained of a "bad feeling" and started to hyperventilate. The mysterious symptoms soon began to spread as word got around that the girls were actually under "psychic attack", leading to several hospitalizations and calls from some of the students to bring in an exorcist.

The incident is the latest in a number of high profile mass hysteria cases that seem to predominantly involve all-girl schools in Japan and other countries where tales of ghosts, spirits and demons are commonplace.




Source : http://whofortedblog.com/2013/06/26/real-life-carrie-students-psychic-attack-at-japanese-all-girls-school-sends-18-to-hospital/

In a fantastically strange bit of news from the Land of the Rising Sun, a “psychic attack” straight out of a Stephen King novel was reported at an all-girls school, sending over a dozen to the hospital and shaking up the student body.

At the well-known prep school Kamigōri High in Hyogo, Japan, emergency services were called out and a reported 18 girls were taken to two separate hospitals after what was described as a bizarre, hour long “state of panic” during which dozens of teen girls began hyperventilating.

The initial incident began around 11:45am when a first year student began complaining of a “bad feeling”. Her hyperventilating sparked a chain of similar events that affected 17 first years, and one third year student.
Things got even stranger when rumors began spreading that the incident was actually the work of a psychic attack dealt from the first girl to exhibit the bizarre symptoms.

According to the Aioi police department, it was well known amongst the other students that the girl displayed “supernatural senses” and they believed she was to blame for the hospitalizations.

Some of the girls at Kamigori High took to Facebook and Twitter to air their concerns following the event.
“This doesn’t seem like simple hyperventilation,”fellow student Kaisei Yoshimura said. “There are a lot of suspicious rumors spreading around the internet. Wonder if they’re better off calling in an exorcist?”

The victims have since been released from the hospital and have shown no long term after effects. The girl accused of psychically attacking her fellow students has not responded to rumors about her alleged psychic abilities and authorities have not released her name to the public, although I suspect it might be Carrie.
What do you think happened at the prep-school? Did a Japanese “Carrie” show a display of psychic powers? Or was this simply a case of mass hysteria? Share your thoughts with us on Facebook, tweet us @WhoForted, or leave a comment below!


Cursed Phone Number


Cursed Phone Number!

Bulgarian Mobile Phone Company 'Mobitel' suspends phone number 0888 888 888 after everyone assigned to it died in rather unpleasant ways.

The first, one of their own bosses who died of cancer - investigation finds the cancer may have been the result of radiation poisoning.

The other two men were involved in shady business dealings ie. running cocaine and other criminal activities.

Curse or murderous rivals?


You judge, but just incase if by chance you are offered the number maybe go for another...





Amityville Ghost Boy Photo

Monday, July 1, 2013

School officials suspend classes over ‘evil spirits’


ONE OF the students allegedly possessed by evil"
spirits at Isaac Lopez Integrated School in
Mandaluyong City. 

Classes were suspended Thursday at Isaac Lopez Integrated School in Mandaluyong City after around 20 students aged between 12 and 16 started acting strangely—screaming, crying, fainting and convulsing—prompting claims that they were possessed by evil spirits.

Julie Esparagoza, a Grade 8 teacher at the public school, said the incident started shortly after 9 a.m. and initially involved two girls from her section.

She said that she and her students were in a classroom when one of the girls suddenly stood up and began acting strangely while the other lost consciousness.

Esparagoza added that the girl who stood up had to be restrained at one point since it looked like she was going to attack her unconscious classmate.

She said she immediately brought the two girls to separate classrooms where their behavior gradually returned to normal.

Esparagoza, however, said she later observed the same behavior among her other students who had stepped out of the classroom for their break.

According to her, she saw five girls and a boy “lying on the floor and shaking while others were crying frantically.”

A male student who refused to be named said he saw one girl “convulsing” on the ground near the stage in the middle of the playground while another was “in tears.” “I helped bring them to the principal’s office,” he said.

They were not the only students who were affected. Esparagoza said the same behavior was observed in other Grade 8 students from five different sections.

She added that she tried looking for a priest to help the affected students but the staff of two churches she called up told her that the priest was not available.

A pastor from the nearby Born-Again Jesus First Christian Ministries said he rushed to the school when he learned of the incident from a church member.

“The students were shouting: ‘I don’t want to! I don’t want to!’  Others were shouting ‘Princess!’” Pastor Boyet Sion told the Inquirer, saying that no one knew who Princess was.

He said he prayed for the students and they calmed down a  few minutes later.

According to Editha Septimo, the officer in charge of the high school section, some of the affected students were taken to the principal’s office while the others were brought to a classroom where a doctor attended to them.

Septimo said she had no choice but to suspend classes in the Grade 8 level at 10 a.m. after parents started rushing to the school to get their children out of fear that they would also be “possessed.”

“The parents were very frantic, some were hurling insults at us,” she added.

However, as soon as the unaffected Grade 8 students were allowed to go home, at least four Grade 7 students began exhibiting the same behavior, Esparagoza said.

This prompted Nerissa Lozaria, assistant schools division superintendent, to suspend classes in the entire school.

Several of the “possessed” students were allowed to go home after they calmed down while the others were taken to a nearby church where they were blessed, Esparagoza said.

A worker at the church who refused to be named said around 10 students were brought there for exorcism but they later left, some of them to attend Mass at Quiapo Church.

Those who witnessed the incident, meanwhile, were divided about what happened.

Septimo was skeptical and called the incident a case of “mass hysteria” caused by students who just wanted attention.

She cited one “possessed” student whose behavior immediately returned to normal after she was told she would be injected with something to calm her down.

Septimo said that this was the first such incident at the school.

Sion, for his part, said the incident was clearly a case of “evil spirits possessing the students.”

According to him, he heard reports that some of the affected pupils had earlier conducted a seance (spirit of the glass) at a cemetery near the school.

“They might have invited the spirits [to possess them],” he said.

His theory was supported by a church worker who said that two children were taken to the church hours before the incident at the school.

The complaint of those who brought the two children in: They seemed to be possessed by evil spirits.
The church worker said that several balete trees were cut down at the school only recently to give way to the construction of a covered court. This may have angered some spirits, the worker added.



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